Posts Tagged ‘Bayo Canyon’

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More radioactive goodies from Bayo Canyon

March 2, 2011

I’ve written about this place twice before, and a bumper crop of radioactive souvenirs from a February visit compels my new assessment that Bayo Canyon, New Mexico is simply unmissable for any hardcore nuclear tourist.  Of course, there’s the historical dimension:  the radiolanthanum experiments that commenced here in 1944 provided crucial insight into the implosion weapon design validated in 1945 by the Trinity test (and embodied later by “Fat Man” and virtually all successive bombs).  But what makes Bayo so special is that the history here is tangible, collectable, and detectable provided you come with a Geiger counter.

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The next four photos at left show pieces of blast debris that were scattered across the surface near the escarpment under Point Weather (where I am standing, 2nd photo above), along with readings in counts per minute on a Ludlum 44-9 pancake GM tube.  While the great majority of findings are not detectably hot, there is so much debris available that the prospects for major finds here are good.  This is my second piece of radioactive cable, and the other two pieces appear to be aluminum metal.  For comparison, local background is about 60 CPM.

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There is sufficient gamma radiation to identify uranium in one of these samples by scintillation spectrometry and to estimate its present activity.  The piece of cable was my choice for this test, owing to easy source-detector geometry and negligible self-absorption.  The last image is the 2000-second NaI:Tl gamma energy spectrum.  The peaks are consistent with the prominent decay radiation of U-235 at 185.72 keV (emitted in 57.2% of decays).  Assuming a geometric efficiency of ~50% and an intrinsic photopeak efficiency of ~75%, the piece of cable contains about 8 mg of uranium if the uranium has its natural isotopic ratio, or about 20 mg if it is depleted. (Both DU and natural U were used in the Bayo experiments.)

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Radioactive Treasure in Bayo Canyon

November 11, 2010

Bayo Canyon, near Los Alamos, NM, was a testing ground for radioactive explosives during and after the Manhattan Project. Unfortunately, though it is public land now, it isn’t the most accessible place.  This photo depicts the canyon from its western rim last fall when I tried to get in with a friend.  The deep snow was a show-stopper on the trail leading down from the town on that day.  There is an access road that enters the canyon and provides for an easy walk to the blast sites, but it is gated, and unauthorized vehicles lured in by an open gate may find it locked when attempting to exit.  In spite of the hassle, however, I can now attest that Bayo Canyon is a bona fide destination for radioactive collectibles.

I returned to Bayo Canyon in the company of Taylor Wilson on October 16, and discovered my first radioactive token from this locality—a short piece of shielded two-conductor cable that reads about 600 CPM on a 2″ pancake Geiger tube.  It’s not screaming hot, but it means there’s more here.  (Photo credit: Tom Clynes; used with permission).

Los Alamos’ TA-10 facility in Bayo Canyon entered its decommissioning phase in 1960, and since then the canyon floor has been subject to sustained scrutiny from cleanup crews.  However, it’s obviously true that a persistent and focused hobbyist with good radiation detection equipment can beat a veritable army of government nine-to-fivers when it comes to truffling out the good stuff.  The DOE’s Radiological Survey of the Bayo Canyon, Los Alamos Final Report (1979) explains the nature of the residual contamination:

Because of the wide dispersal of debris by the tests and continuing natural erosion processes, it was recognized at the time of decommissioning that there was a reasonable probability that some high-explosive and some potentially radioactive materials remained in the canyon.  Thus, periodic surface surveys and searches were conducted in 1966, ’67, ’69, ’71, ’73, ’75, and ’76.  During such surveys a number of additional pieces of debris were located, with only a few of them being contaminated with “°Sr or including normal or depleted uranium.

Indeed there are many remaining pieces of debris, often entertaining in their own right if not detectably radioactive.  The pieces of metal in this last photo are representative; both exhibit extreme distortion from the force of whatever blast hurled them through the woods sixty years ago.

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2142 AD

July 12, 2008
Radioactive contamination marker

2142 AD is the year in which Bayo Canyon, New Mexico will be safe for unrestricted use. But today, it has a radioactive contamination problem on account of the TA-10 complex, Los Alamos National Laboratory, that occupied the wooded canyon until cleanup 45 years ago. What was done here was rather interesting:

The Los Alamos National Laboratory […] conducted 254 radioactive lanthanum implosion experiments from September 1944 through March 1962. The purpose of these experiments was to test implosion designs for nuclear weapons. Conventional high explosives surrounding common metals (used as surrogates for plutonium) and a radioactive source, as small as one-eighth inch in diameter and containing up to several thousand curies of radioactive lanthanum, were involved in each experiment detonated. (Dummer, Tascher, Courtright 1996)

In other words, they built and detonated huge, open-air “dirty bombs.”

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